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Posted on Jan 9, 2013 in News | 0 comments

’2013 Space Launches Schedule at Cape Canaveral.

’2013 Space Launches Schedule at Cape Canaveral.

Written by: TCBP Staff

It looks like ’2013 will be a busy year with a series of launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Officials at the Air Force 45th Space Wing, stated 15 launches are on the schedule for 2013.

At this time, the plan we have been able to get shows 12 scheduled launches . We list below the most up to date calendar that is subject to changes, and new launches could be added.

We will try to update the schedule on a regular basis via our Facebook page on a regular basis at: http://www.facebook.com/TheCBPost/events .

The closest launch will take place around the 29th of January with the Atlas 5.

Jan. 29/30. Atlas 5  •  TDRS K

Launch window: 0152-0232 GMT on 30th (8:52-9:32 p.m. EST on 29th). Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket (AV-036) will launch the TDRS K communications and delay relay satellite for NASA. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) connects mission control with the International Space Station and other orbiting satellites. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from June 12, Dec. 6, Dec. 13 and Jan. 18.

February. Delta 4  •  WGS 5

Launch window: TBD. Launch site: SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will the fifth Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Jan. 18.

March 1. Falcon 9  •  SpaceX CRS 2

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the fourth Dragon spacecraft on the second operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from December and Jan. 18.

March. Atlas 5  •  SBIRS GEO 2

Launch window: TBD. Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the U.S. military’s second Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite, or SBIRS GEO 2, for missile early-warning detection. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Moved forward from May.

May. Atlas 5  •  GPS 2F-4

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will deploy the Air Force’s fourth Block 2F navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March.

June. Delta 4  •  WGS 6

Launch window: TBD. Launch site: SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will the fifth Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters.

June. Falcon 9  •  SES 8

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SES 8 communications satellite. SES 8 will provide Ku-band and Ka-band direct-to-home broadcasting and network services over the Asia-Pacific region. The rocket will fly in the Falcon 9 v1.1 configuration with upgraded Merlin 1D engines, stretched fuel tanks, and a payload fairing.

July. Atlas 5  •  MUOS 2

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the second Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite for the U.S. Navy. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide narrowband tactical communications designed to significantly improve ground communications for U.S. forces on the move. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.

August. Falcon 9  •  Orbcomm OG2

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch eight second-generation Orbcomm communications satellites. The satellites will operate for Orbcomm Inc., providing two-way data messaging services for global customers. The rocket will fly in the Falcon 9 v1.1 configuration with upgraded Merlin 1D engines, stretched fuel tanks, and a payload fairing.

September. Atlas 5  •  AEHF 3

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the third Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 531 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.

Sept. 30. Falcon 9  •  SpaceX CRS 3

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the fifth Dragon spacecraft on the third operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from April 6.

Nov. 18. Atlas 5  •  MAVEN

Launch time: TBD. Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission. The MAVEN orbiter will study the upper atmosphere of Mars and determine the role the loss of atmospheric gas to space played in changing the Martian climate through time. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.

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